The Medical Warehouse Ltd.

Emergency Care Bandage

The Emergency Bandage is a first-aid treatment device for the staunching of blood flow from traumatic hemorrhagic wounds in pre-hospital emergency situations.

The Emergency Bandage consolidates numerous treatment equipment into a single unit and provide in one device:

  • Non-adherent pad. Eliminating the risk of causing pain and having the wound re-opened upon removal of the bandage.
  • Pressure Applicator. Creating the immediate direct pressure to the wound site.
  • Secondary Sterile Dressing. Keeping the wound area clean and maintaining the pad and pressure on the wound firmly in place, including immobilization of the injured limb or body part.
  • Closure Bar. Enabling closure and fixation of the Emergency Bandage at any point, on all parts of the body: no pins and clips, no tape, no velcro, no knots.
  • Quick and easy application and Self-application. Designed with the end-user in mind; for the first-aid trained and the lay caregiver.
  • Significant per treatment time and cost savings.

The Emergency Bandage is for the untrained lay person as well as the paramedical professional. The bandage features ergonomic designs for quick and easy application to free the caregiver from searching for additional equipment. Focus and control in treatment are enhanced. The Emergency Bandage saves time in an emergency situation where every second is crucial. The Emergency Bandage consolidates the functions of numerous separate pieces of equipment into a single easy-to-use unit. Application is simple and quick. As one unit the bandage performs multiple functions, and therefore enhances the treatment provided.

The Emergency Bandage provides injury victims acting alone the ability to accomplish the entire bandaging operation independently, including, in certain cases, tourniquet application, even if using only one hand.

Immediate and effective direct pressure to the wound may reduce the need for a tourniquet application. This is an important benefit as tourniquet applications are to be avoided and used only as a last resort. In certain cases, if a tourniquet is required the closure bar is removed from above the pressure bar and inserted between previous revolutions of the wrapping leader 5cm above the wound, over the blood vessel, and rotated. This rotation twists the wrapping leader until the blood flow to the wound site is constricted. After a tourniquet has been achieved, the closure bar is used as before to secure and maintain the tourniquet as well as the secondary sterile wound covering which is still in place.